Episode #10: ‘The Psychedelic Sound’

What elements make up a psychedelic song-be it rock, pop or folk, British or American, East or West Coast? 1960s artists didn’t categorize the music. They were just pushing the envelope-lyrically, musically, technologically-while ingesting the necessary chemicals. So, differentiating between the authentic, borderline and phony is a largely subjective topic, as revealed in this episode’s acid-drenched discussion between Richard, Erik, Allan and Craig. And there’s also a brief cameo by Donovan.

The featured tracks include:

  • ‘2000 Light Years from Home’ – The Rolling Stones
  • ‘Eight Miles High’ – The Byrds
  • ‘All Along the Watchtower’ – The Jimi Hendrix Experience
  • ‘It’s All Too Much’ – The Beatles
  • ‘Psychotic Reaction’ – Count Five
  • ‘Mind Flowers’ – Ultimate Spinach
  • ‘Hole in My Shoe’ – Traffic
  • ‘Pictures of Matchstick Men’ – Status Quo
  • ‘Magic Potion’ – The Open Mind
  • ‘Time Has Come Today’ – The Chambers Brothers
  • ‘Incense and Peppermints’ – Strawberry Alarm Clock
  • ‘Itchycoo Park’ – The Small Faces
  • ‘Astronomy Domine’ – Pink Floyd
  • ‘White Rabbit’ – Jefferson Airplane
  • ‘I Had Too Much to Dream (Last Night)’ – The Electric Prunes
  • ‘1983… (A Merman I Should Turn to Be)’ – The Jimi Hendrix Experience
  • ‘My White Bicycle’ – Tomorrow
  • ‘A Very Cellular Song’ – The Incredible String Band
  • ‘Witches Hat’ – The Incredible String Band
  • ‘Porpoise Song’ – The Monkees
  • ‘Hurdy Gurdy Man’ – Donovan
  • ‘Good Vibrations’ – The Beach Boys
  • ‘Third Stone from the Sun’ – The Jimi Hendrix Experience
  • ‘The Star Spangled Banner’ – Jimi Hendrix

Episode #9: ‘The Trip: from Rubber Soul to Revolver – How LSD Impacted The Beatles’.

“I don’t see too much difference between Rubber Soul and Revolver,” George said in the ‘Beatles Anthology’ documentary. “To me, they could be Volume One and Volume Two.”

Many might think he should have paired Revolver with Sgt. Pepper. But, bearing in mind that George wasn’t nearly as involved with Pepper, let’s view things from his perspective…

In August 1965, John and George took acid intentionally for the first time, together with Ringo. In October and November, The Beatles recorded Rubber Soul. The following month, 10 days after the album’s release, a day after the end of the group’s final UK tour, Paul took LSD for the first time (with Guinness heir Tara Browne). Less than four months later, the Revolver sessions began.

Very different albums, but within just five months of one another: ‘Volume One’ shortly after three Beatles had dropped acid; ‘Volume Two’ after Paul had done so.

Featuring ear-catching, ultra-rare audio clips, this episode will dive deep into how hallucinogens influenced not only The Beatles’ songwriting and studio techniques during this period of unsurpassed group unity, but also the attitudes and instrumentation evident on record.

Episode #8: ‘Actors Go Pop (Part 1)’

This show’s just the first installment of a multi-parter because, if you do a little research, you’ll discover that it might be easier to compile a list of famous actors who, back in the 1960s, didn’t record a pop song… or album… or several of them. They were all at it, on both sides of the Atlantic, and some of the results weren’t nearly as bad as you might think. Some were actually quite good while others were at least amusing. Such is the varied selection we have here:

  • Peter Sellers & Sophia Loren, ‘Goodness Gracious Me’ & ‘Bangers and Mash’
  • Richard Chamberlain, ‘Three Stars Will Shine Tonight’
  • Audrey Hepburn, ‘Moon River’
  • William Shatner, ‘Lucy in the Sky with Diamonds’
  • Leonard Nimoy, ‘Highly Illogical’
  • Bette Davis & Debbie Burton, ‘What Ever Happened to Baby Jane?’
  • Barbara Eden, ‘Bend It’
  • Patrick Macnee & Honor Blackman, ‘Kinky Boots’
  • Lorne Greene, ‘Ringo’
  • Pattie Duke, ‘Say Something Funny’
  • Yaphet Kotto, ‘Have You Dug This Scene’
  • Brigitte Bardot, ‘Harley Davidson’
  • Brigitte Bardot, Jane Birkin & Serge Gainsbourg, ‘Je t’aime… moi non plus’