Episode #9: ‘The Trip: from Rubber Soul to Revolver – How LSD Impacted The Beatles’.

“I don’t see too much difference between Rubber Soul and Revolver,” George said in the ‘Beatles Anthology’ documentary. “To me, they could be Volume One and Volume Two.”

Many might think he should have paired Revolver with Sgt. Pepper. But, bearing in mind that George wasn’t nearly as involved with Pepper, let’s view things from his perspective…

In August 1965, John and George took acid intentionally for the first time, together with Ringo. In October and November, The Beatles recorded Rubber Soul. The following month, 10 days after the album’s release, a day after the end of the group’s final UK tour, Paul took LSD for the first time (with Guinness heir Tara Browne). Less than four months later, the Revolver sessions began.

Very different albums, but within just five months of one another: ‘Volume One’ shortly after three Beatles had dropped acid; ‘Volume Two’ after Paul had done so.

Featuring ear-catching, ultra-rare audio clips, this episode will dive deep into how hallucinogens influenced not only The Beatles’ songwriting and studio techniques during this period of unsurpassed group unity, but also the attitudes and instrumentation evident on record.

Episode #8: ‘Actors Go Pop (Part 1)’

This show’s just the first installment of a multi-parter because, if you do a little research, you’ll discover that it might be easier to compile a list of famous actors who, back in the 1960s, didn’t record a pop song… or album… or several of them. They were all at it, on both sides of the Atlantic, and some of the results weren’t nearly as bad as you might think. Some were actually quite good while others were at least amusing. Such is the varied selection we have here:

  • Peter Sellers & Sophia Loren, ‘Goodness Gracious Me’ & ‘Bangers and Mash’
  • Richard Chamberlain, ‘Three Stars Will Shine Tonight’
  • Audrey Hepburn, ‘Moon River’
  • William Shatner, ‘Lucy in the Sky with Diamonds’
  • Leonard Nimoy, ‘Highly Illogical’
  • Bette Davis & Debbie Burton, ‘What Ever Happened to Baby Jane?’
  • Barbara Eden, ‘Bend It’
  • Patrick Macnee & Honor Blackman, ‘Kinky Boots’
  • Lorne Greene, ‘Ringo’
  • Pattie Duke, ‘Say Something Funny’
  • Yaphet Kotto, ‘Have You Dug This Scene’
  • Brigitte Bardot, ‘Harley Davidson’
  • Brigitte Bardot, Jane Birkin & Serge Gainsbourg, ‘Je t’aime… moi non plus’

Episode #7: ‘Worst Hit Records of the 1960s – Part 1’

Just because a record’s a hit doesn’t mean it’s good. And there are many good records that never achieve chart success. This show focuses on the former: 1960s singles that cracked the top 100 in the U.S. and/or U.K.—in certain cases even topping it—yet which are universally condemned or divide opinions: some people love them, others hate them.

Incorporating several of their own choices with those of listeners, Richard and Erik bravely take a trip through an assortment of Sixties stinkers—ranging from novelty records to artistic blunders—and also recruit the Celebrated Mr. K (Allan Kozinn)  to try figure out what in hell the artists and composers were thinking.

Following are the featured tracks. But this is just the beginning—no way can all of the contenders fit into a single episode…

  • Ray Stevens — Jeremiah Peabody’s Polyunsaturated Quick-Dissolving Fast-Acting Pleasant Tasting Green and Purple Pills
  • Brian Hyland — Itsy Bitsy Teeny Weeny Yellow Polka Dot Bikini
  • The Trashmen — Surfin’ Bird
  • Jimmy Cross — I Want My Baby Back
  • Freddie and the Dreamers — Do the Freddie
  • Elvis Presley — Do the Clam
  • Mrs. Miller — Downtown/A Lover’s Concerto
  • Sgt. Barry Sadler — The Ballad of the Green Berets
  • Esther and Abi Ofarim — Cinderella Rockefella
  • Senator Bobby — Wild Thing
  • 1910 Fruitgum Company — Simon Says
  • Richard Harris — MacArthur Park
  • Tiny Tim — Tip Toe Thru’ the Tulips With Me