Episode #10: ‘The Psychedelic Sound’

What elements make up a psychedelic song-be it rock, pop or folk, British or American, East or West Coast? 1960s artists didn’t categorize the music. They were just pushing the envelope-lyrically, musically, technologically-while ingesting the necessary chemicals. So, differentiating between the authentic, borderline and phony is a largely subjective topic, as revealed in this episode’s acid-drenched discussion between Richard, Erik, Allan and Craig. And there’s also a brief cameo by Donovan.

The featured tracks include:

  • ‘2000 Light Years from Home’ – The Rolling Stones
  • ‘Eight Miles High’ – The Byrds
  • ‘All Along the Watchtower’ – The Jimi Hendrix Experience
  • ‘It’s All Too Much’ – The Beatles
  • ‘Psychotic Reaction’ – Count Five
  • ‘Mind Flowers’ – Ultimate Spinach
  • ‘Hole in My Shoe’ – Traffic
  • ‘Pictures of Matchstick Men’ – Status Quo
  • ‘Magic Potion’ – The Open Mind
  • ‘Time Has Come Today’ – The Chambers Brothers
  • ‘Incense and Peppermints’ – Strawberry Alarm Clock
  • ‘Itchycoo Park’ – The Small Faces
  • ‘Astronomy Domine’ – Pink Floyd
  • ‘White Rabbit’ – Jefferson Airplane
  • ‘I Had Too Much to Dream (Last Night)’ – The Electric Prunes
  • ‘1983… (A Merman I Should Turn to Be)’ – The Jimi Hendrix Experience
  • ‘My White Bicycle’ – Tomorrow
  • ‘A Very Cellular Song’ – The Incredible String Band
  • ‘Witches Hat’ – The Incredible String Band
  • ‘Porpoise Song’ – The Monkees
  • ‘Hurdy Gurdy Man’ – Donovan
  • ‘Good Vibrations’ – The Beach Boys
  • ‘Third Stone from the Sun’ – The Jimi Hendrix Experience
  • ‘The Star Spangled Banner’ – Jimi Hendrix

Episode #9: ‘The Trip: from Rubber Soul to Revolver – How LSD Impacted The Beatles’.

“I don’t see too much difference between Rubber Soul and Revolver,” George said in the ‘Beatles Anthology’ documentary. “To me, they could be Volume One and Volume Two.”

Many might think he should have paired Revolver with Sgt. Pepper. But, bearing in mind that George wasn’t nearly as involved with Pepper, let’s view things from his perspective…

In August 1965, John and George took acid intentionally for the first time, together with Ringo. In October and November, The Beatles recorded Rubber Soul. The following month, 10 days after the album’s release, a day after the end of the group’s final UK tour, Paul took LSD for the first time (with Guinness heir Tara Browne). Less than four months later, the Revolver sessions began.

Very different albums, but within just five months of one another: ‘Volume One’ shortly after three Beatles had dropped acid; ‘Volume Two’ after Paul had done so.

Featuring ear-catching, ultra-rare audio clips, this episode will dive deep into how hallucinogens influenced not only The Beatles’ songwriting and studio techniques during this period of unsurpassed group unity, but also the attitudes and instrumentation evident on record.

Episode #8: ‘Actors Go Pop (Part 1)’

This show’s just the first installment of a multi-parter because, if you do a little research, you’ll discover that it might be easier to compile a list of famous actors who, back in the 1960s, didn’t record a pop song… or album… or several of them. They were all at it, on both sides of the Atlantic, and some of the results weren’t nearly as bad as you might think. Some were actually quite good while others were at least amusing. Such is the varied selection we have here:

  • Peter Sellers & Sophia Loren, ‘Goodness Gracious Me’ & ‘Bangers and Mash’
  • Richard Chamberlain, ‘Three Stars Will Shine Tonight’
  • Audrey Hepburn, ‘Moon River’
  • William Shatner, ‘Lucy in the Sky with Diamonds’
  • Leonard Nimoy, ‘Highly Illogical’
  • Bette Davis & Debbie Burton, ‘What Ever Happened to Baby Jane?’
  • Barbara Eden, ‘Bend It’
  • Patrick Macnee & Honor Blackman, ‘Kinky Boots’
  • Lorne Greene, ‘Ringo’
  • Pattie Duke, ‘Say Something Funny’
  • Yaphet Kotto, ‘Have You Dug This Scene’
  • Brigitte Bardot, ‘Harley Davidson’
  • Brigitte Bardot, Jane Birkin & Serge Gainsbourg, ‘Je t’aime… moi non plus’

Episode #7: ‘Worst Hit Records of the 1960s – Part 1’

Just because a record’s a hit doesn’t mean it’s good. And there are many good records that never achieve chart success. This show focuses on the former: 1960s singles that cracked the top 100 in the U.S. and/or U.K.—in certain cases even topping it—yet which are universally condemned or divide opinions: some people love them, others hate them.

Incorporating several of their own choices with those of listeners, Richard and Erik bravely take a trip through an assortment of Sixties stinkers—ranging from novelty records to artistic blunders—and also recruit the Celebrated Mr. K (Allan Kozinn)  to try figure out what in hell the artists and composers were thinking.

Following are the featured tracks. But this is just the beginning—no way can all of the contenders fit into a single episode…

  • Ray Stevens — Jeremiah Peabody’s Polyunsaturated Quick-Dissolving Fast-Acting Pleasant Tasting Green and Purple Pills
  • Brian Hyland — Itsy Bitsy Teeny Weeny Yellow Polka Dot Bikini
  • The Trashmen — Surfin’ Bird
  • Jimmy Cross — I Want My Baby Back
  • Freddie and the Dreamers — Do the Freddie
  • Elvis Presley — Do the Clam
  • Mrs. Miller — Downtown/A Lover’s Concerto
  • Sgt. Barry Sadler — The Ballad of the Green Berets
  • Esther and Abi Ofarim — Cinderella Rockefella
  • Senator Bobby — Wild Thing
  • 1910 Fruitgum Company — Simon Says
  • Richard Harris — MacArthur Park
  • Tiny Tim — Tip Toe Thru’ the Tulips With Me

Episode #6: ‘The Beatles – George & Ringo’s White Album’

In this final installment of the STTS ‘White Album’ trilogy, Erik and Richard team up with musician Craig Bartock and musicologist Allan Kozinn to discuss the contributions by The Beatles’ lead guitarist and drummer – as well as what might have been in terms of tracks that didn’t make it onto the album. In so doing, they prove that, between them, the pair would have been capable of creating far more than just an EP!

Once again, Craig doesn’t have a track listing – but the other three do…

Erik

1. It’s All Too Much (long version)

2. While My Guitar Gently Weeps

3. Don’t Pass Me By

4. Savoy Truffle

5. Piggies

6. The Inner Light

7. Dehra Dun

8. Circles

9. Not Guilty

10. Sour Milk Sea

11. Long, Long, Long

12. Only a Northern Song

13. Good Night

14. While My Guitar Gently Weeps (Take 1)

Richard

1. While My Guitar Gently Weeps (acoustic & electric)

2. Piggies

3. Long, Long, Long

4. Don’t Pass Me By

5. Savoy Truffle

6. Not Guilty

7. Dehra Dun

8. Sour Milk Sea

9. Circles/Only a Northern Song

10. It’s All Too Much (long version)

11. Good Night

Allan

1. While My Guitar Gently Weeps

2. Piggies

3. Don’t Pass Me By

4. Long, Long, Long

5. Savoy Truffle

6. Circles

7. Only a Northern Song

8. Not Guilty

9. The Inner Light

10. Dehra Dun

11. Sour Milk Sea

12. It’s All Too Much (long version)

13. Good Night

Episode #5: ‘The Profumo Affair – Sex, Lies… and Beatlemania’

Pimps, drug dealers, call girls, kinky orgies involving members of the ruling class, a government minister sharing a mistress with a Russian spy, a suicide… and the Prime Minister’s resignation. This was the scandal that rocked Britain in 1963—along with The Beatles simultaneously providing an alternative form of entertainment.

Among the featured tracks:

‘From Russia with Love’ – Matt Monroe

‘Do You Want to Know a Secret’ – Billy J. Kramer with the Dakotas

‘On the Rebound’ – Floyd Cramer

‘Runaway’ – Del Shannon

‘My Bonnie’ – Tony Sheridan & The Beatles

‘You Don’t Know’ – Helen Shapiro

‘Tower of Strength’ – Frankie Vaughan

‘Come Outside’ – Mike Sarne with Wendy Richard

‘Telstar’ – The Tornados

‘All I Do is Dream’ – Mandy Rice-Davies

‘Please Please Me’ – The Beatles

‘Dance On’ – The Shadows

‘Let’s Dance’ – Chris Montez

‘Summer Holiday’ – Cliff Richard

‘The Cruel Sea’ – The Dakotas

‘How Do You Do It’ – Gerry and the Pacemakers

‘From Me to You’ – The Beatles

‘Confessin’ (That I Love You)’ – Frank Ifield

‘(You’re The) Devil in Disguise’ – Elvis Presley

‘She Loves You’ – The Beatles

‘I’ll Get You’ (live) – The Beatles

‘Nothing Has Been Proved’ – Dusty Springfield

PLUS ultra-rare clips of The Beatles performing at London’s Royal Albert Hall and Walthamstow Granada in the spring of 1963.

Episode #4: ‘The Beatles – Paul McCartney’s White Album’

In this second instalment of an STTS ‘White Album’ trilogy, Richard and Erik are once again joined by musician Craig Bartock and musicologist Allan Kozinn to discuss an incredibly diverse collection of Paul McCartney tracks; ranging from novelty numbers and classic ballads to proto-grunge head-bangers and timeless rockers.

While Craig’s happy to kick things off with ‘Back in the U.S.S.R.’ and end with ‘Hey Jude’, his three colleagues have come up with their own track listings…

Richard

  1. Back in the U.S.S.R.
  2. Wild Honey Pie
  3. Mother Nature’s Son
  4. Why Don’t We Do It in the Road?
  5. Martha My Dear
  6. Ob-La-Di, Ob-La-Da
  7. Blackbird
  8. Helter Skelter
  9. I Will
  10. Rocky Raccoon
  11. Honey Pie
  12. Birthday
  13. Hey Jude

Erik

  1. Back in the U.S.S.R.
  2. Blackbird
  3. Jubilee
  4. I Will
  5. Birthday
  6. Can You Take Me Back?
  7. Honey Pie
  8. Helter Skelter
  9. Why Don’t We Do It in the Road?
  10. Rocky Raccoon
  11. Ob-La-Di, Ob-La-Da
  12. Martha My Dear
  13. Heather
  14. Mother Nature’s Son
  15. Hey Jude
  16. Wild Honey Pie

Allan (issuing his version of the album only on vinyl)

Side One

  1. Back in the U.S.S.R.
  2. Mother Nature’s Son
  3. Ob-La-Di, Ob-La-Da
  4. Martha My Dear
  5. Blackbird
  6. Rocky Raccoon
  7. I Will

Side Two

  1. Birthday
  2. Hey Jude
  3. Honey Pie
  4. Wild Honey Pie
  5. Why Don’t We Do It in the Road?
  6. Helter Skelter
  7. Junk

Episode #3: ‘Notable Namechecks in Song’

Not tribute songs. More like honourable mentions. Some made in jest. Some a nod and a wink (nudge-nudge, say no more). All cultural reflections of their era. Listened to and contrasted within their proper context, they tell a fascinating Sixties story, populated with colourful characters and some pretty juicy backstories…

The tracks in this case—The Beatles’ ‘Taxman and Dig It’, Bob Dylan’s ‘I Shall Be Free’, Paul Simon’s ‘A Simple Desultory Philippic’, John Lennon and the Plastic Ono Band’s ‘Give Peace a Chance’, Donovan Leitch’s ‘Sunny South Kensington’, Dion DiMucci’s ‘Abraham, Martin and John’, Eric Burdon & The Animals’ ‘Monterey’, The Mamas and Papas’ ‘Creeque Alley’, Peter Sarstedt’s ‘Where Do You Go To (My Lovely)?’ and Jacqueline Taïeb’s ‘7 Heures du Matin’—reference actors, poets, politicians, fellow musicians and assorted other icons.

These include Brigitte Bardot, Muhammad Ali, Martin Luther King, Sophia Loren, Phil Spector, Jefferson Airplane, Jimi Hendrix, The Byrds, The Who, Ravi Shankar, The Rolling Stones, John and Robert Kennedy, Andy Warhol, Elvis Presley, Walt Disney, Doris Day, Marlene Dietrich, Liz Taylor, Lenny Bruce, The Grateful Dead, Pablo Picasso, Mary Quant, Timothy Leary… While the names go on and on, this show about them and the songs in which they’re featured is limited by the boundary of time—but not much else.

So, sit back, crank up the volume and dive into what Donovan’s track describes as “a flip out, skip out, trip out” with Erik Taros and Richard Buskin as your groovin’-era guides…

Episode #2: ‘The Beatles – John Lennon’s White Album’

Who else but The Beatles could produce multiple landmark albums within a landmark album? While A Hard Day’s Night was the only Fab Four long player to be penned solely by Lennon and McCartney, the ‘White Album’ can be enjoyed and analyzed as either a classic team effort or – in line with John’s recollection of the recording sessions – virtuoso individual outings within the group context.

In this first instalment of an STTS ‘White Album’ trilogy, musician Craig Bartock and musicologist Allan Kozinn join Richard and Erik to delve into the talents, circumstances, mindsets and motivations behind an edgy, experimental, bold and beautiful collection of eclectic John Lennon tracks.

Episode #1: ‘July 20, 1969 – Something in the Air’

What were The Beatles doing while man was landing on the moon? How did President Nixon prepare for a potential disaster? Why did some viewers assume the whole thing was a hoax? And what prompted the BBC to play a bad-luck song during the broadcast? These and other burning issues are all part of the conversation while co-hosts Erik Taros and Richard Buskin also dive into Pink Floyd, David Bowie, Easy Rider… and Carry on Camping.

Welcome to the ultimate trip…


Trailer